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The Path of a Bisexual Tantric Rock Star with Robert Ozn TPP122

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Robert Ozn PicIn this episode I’m joined by the vibrant and charming Robert Ozn. He is one of my dearest bisexual allies in the modern tantra movement. We have similar visions of an inclusive non-binary pansexual tantric future where infinite diversity can be expressed and cherished within the fellowship of sex positive spiritual seekers. We learn about his outstanding career in the music and film industries, how he has explored and evolved his sexuality and relationship styles, and how he has been of service to the often still marginalized bisexual community.

Please visit him at at:
http://www.dadanada.com

Here is his ground breaking and genre defining electronic music video:

Here is his current music bio:

After a 26-year absence, L.A. based DaDa NaDa’s comeback record Je Suis Paris/I Am Orlando, a tribute to victims of terror, hit #13 on the U.K.’s Music Week Dance Chart in October 2016. Released on his own label, DaDa Nada Records and featuring his huge, impassioned vocal range, Je Suis Paris/I Am Orlando, was a staple that fall on four Gaydio (U.K.’s largest Internet radio station) programs and a huge banger in LGBTQ & straight clubs alike. “I’m humbled that with so many odds against it – no corporate money or promo machine – the track made it. I call it The Little Record That Could.”

DaDa NaDa’s follow-up, We Can Feel It, written & produced by DaDa NaDa and Steve White, with its first set of mixes by House of Virus (House), Mntna (Deep House) and Middle Eastern, Number One iTunes sensation Aman (Pop Mix), releases in September 2017. The lyrics reflect the mystical, spiritual aspects of love – a theme which DaDa NaDa’s ardently explores as he is an out bisexual, living a polyamorous lifestyle and has been a devoted student of eastern religious practices for most of his life.

Impassioned about LGBTQ rights and BiPride, he was an honored participant in the Obama Administration’s 2016 White House Briefing on Bisexuality and stands as the Chairperson of the Los Angeles Bi Task Force. In June 2017, LA Pride’s #ResistMarch featured him in a video shown to over 100,000 protesters, a first for a Bi+ leader in that event’s 45 year history.

DaDa NaDa – solo moniker for Robert Ozn – was a former Broadway actor and the vocal half of New York, 80s synth-pop duo EBN/OZN, early pioneers of the now commonplace elements of music sampling and white rap, who are widely credited as making the first commercially released and charted record ever made on a computer (a Firelight C.M.I.) in the USA, the self-written and produced Top 20 Billboard Club Chart AEIOU Sometimes Y, produced in 1982/1983 (Elektra), remixed by John Luongo. Garnering accolades from critics and fans alike, AEIOU shot him into bona fide rock stardom.

After an MTV and Top 40 Billboard Dance Chart follow up, Bag Lady, whose video starred Emmy and Tony Award winner, Imogene Coca, plus a Top 20 College Chart hit album Feeling Cavalier, EBN/OZN disbanded.

Under the alias DaDa NaDa, he first broke the Billboard Top Five in 1989; with the Hip-House hit Haunted House, remixed by Chicago based Mike Hitman Wilson. According to MTV News, it was the first House record by a white artist to ever cross over to a commercial chart in the United States. “The 80s/early 90s were a magical window when the U.S. music business’ racial barriers blurred. It was an amazing, creative time.”

The follow-up, Deep Love, remixed by the Godfather of House Frankie Knuckles & David Morales and Bad Boy Bill also a Top Five Billboard smash, turned him into a darling of the American and U.K. music press with Music Week Magazine covering him in a feature entitled The Wizard of Ozn. The Knuckles/David Morales mix featured that same sensual DaDa NaDa baritone on We Can Feel It. “Frankie had been supporting my music in the early days when I did eccentric rap/spoken word and to have him push me as a singer gave me a new level of confidence. I’ll always be grateful.”

More hits followed, but things went very wrong during his US tour that year – a shooting interrupted his show in Chicago and he started feeling a break from music was in order. That break lasted 26 years – working in the Hollywood film industry as a script analyst for major directors and film companies, as well as writing and producing films. “When I returned to music last year, I had no idea how I’d be received. I have to admit, I was trepidatious. But people – audiences, DJs, PDs – have been amazing – so welcoming, so warm and most important, they’re playing my music. I feel like I’m coming home.”